Whether completely remodelling your kitchen or simply looking to replace a tired and worn surface, installing a new floor in your kitchen can often be a tricky decision.

So let us help you with any indecisiveness you may have with our guide on The 10 Best Flooring Ideas for Kitchens that will help picking out that new tiling, carpeting or wood that little bit easier. If you are looking for some information on more than just the floor, check out the Homyze Guide to Kitchens.

 

1) Rubber Floor

This is what rubber flooring looks like

Whether it’s the variety of colours and patterns available, or the choice of either tiles or sheets, rubber flooring has often been a popular choice in commercial kitchens. However, this hasn’t translated itself over to the household kitchen with it often being near the bottom of any ‘best kitchen flooring’ lists.

Costs

Relatively well priced at the £30 to £60 per square metre mark, rubber can however be difficult to get hold of and may require visiting a specialist shop to get the right flooring.

Pros

Resistant to water and all manner of stains, as well as standing up well to daily foot traffic, it’s clear why rubber is the go-to choice for commercial flooring.

Another key reason that makes rubber the ideal choice for kitchens is its simple maintenance, often only requiring a ‘once over’ with a mop to clean. While germs often have a hard time living on the surface of rubber making it great for those with small children.

Cons

Unfortunately, the first thing you will probably notice after installing rubber flooring in your kitchen is its smell. This distinct odour may not be particular pleasant and can be an issue when eating, but it is however not harmful.

While resistant to most day-to-day stains, certain cleaning agents and oils can damage or discolour rubber flooring.

 

2) Concrete Floors

This is what concrete flooring looks likeOffering a clean and modern look to any kitchen, concrete is great at withstanding the mess you would expect in a busy dining area. It is however very cold to the touch, but this can be overcome with underfloor heating.

When it comes to installing concrete flooring, there are two options available, poured concrete or tiling.

  • Ideal for those with an open plan kitchen, poured concrete helps create a more polished finish helping it give your floor a natural look.
  • Meanwhile, concrete tiling is the perfect option for those on a budget and are often more practical, due to the ease of which damaged tiles can be replaced.

Cost

The price of installing concrete flooring varies wildly dependant on the type of flooring, poured concrete or tiling, and the actual work required, such as size of room and whether a structural layer needs applying beforehand. Though most tradesmen will quote of around £100 to £150 per square meter for laying poured concrete, tiling will often come in at a lower price point.

Pros

An incredibly low maintenance kitchen flooring option, concrete also lends itself well to helping create the impression of space within a home due to its ability to reflect light around a room.

Cons

Unfortunately concrete flooring is cold to the touch – unless you install underfloor heating – which isn’t great during the cold winter months. It can also create somewhat of a sterile, office-like atmosphere dependant upon the rest of your kitchen’s design.

 

3) Laminate Wood Floors

This is what laminate wood looks likeAffordable, durable and simple to clean, laminate wood flooring can be a great choice for those looking for a stylish option without any of the hassle. It’s also relatively straightforward to install if you’ve got the tools and are feeling particularly brave.

Cost

When it comes to pricing, laminate wood finds itself towards the more affordable end of the scale. You can typically expect to be paying around £15-£20 to cover a square meter, while for engineered wood flooring the price rises to closer the £30 mark.

Pros

As we’ve previously mentioned, laminate wood is a great looking option for those not planning to blow their budget. It’s also available in a variety of options which makes finding the flooring to suit your current kitchen shouldn’t be too tricky.

Cons

While it may be reliable, laminate wood flooring can often become slippery when wet, which is obviously not great for busy families. It’s also not possible to refinish laminate wood, so replacing your surface may come around sooner than it would with other available flooring options.

 

4) Stone Flooring

This is what stone flooring looks likeWhether it’s marble, travertine, granite, limestone or slate, the choices when it comes to stone flooring are rather vast. It’s also a great option for those looking to bring a traditional, rustic style to their kitchen

Cost

With so much choice available, not to mention the grade and quality, pricing for stone can be relatively varied. At the lower end of the scale you can expect to pay around £30 per square meter, which can than rise all the way to the £500 per square meter mark for really high quality and rare stone.

However, those on a budget may want to look into using reclaimed slabs, as these can help keep the cost of your new floor down.

Pros

Being available in so many varieties means there is a stone flooring option for any kitchen, in any design style. It’s also relatively easy to maintain on a day-to-day basis and is relatively hard wearing, which can work great in a busy area such as the kitchen.

Cons

The most common downfall with stone flooring is how cold to the touch it can be, which certainly isn’t popular during those cold winter months. Though the installation of under floor heating can be a great help to tackling this problem.

Stone also requires regular sealing, while any cleaning products must also be specifically for stone flooring to avoid any damage too.

 

5) Cork Floors

Sustainable, water resistant and an excellent insulator, cork flooring is becoming an increasingly popular flooring choice for those after a natural option in their kitchen.

Cost

At around £10 to £20 per square meter, cork can be a relatively cheap flooring option. And with a relatively straightforward installation process, cork can be the ideal choice for those looking to renovate a kitchen without hiring a tradesman.

Pros

Where to start! Not only is cork water resistant, making it the perfect choice for busy kitchens, its unique structure also makes it more flexible and comfortable to walk on than harder surfaces. Cork is also a great insulator and sound absorber, which can help to create an overall calmer, more comfortable environment to you home.

Cons

While cork appears to be the perfect flooring option, its susceptibility to damage can be quite a major issue for those after a perfect, pristine floor. As a soft material, the daily wear and tear of a busy kitchen will soon take its toll on your cork floor. Cork is also prone to discolouration if exposed to repeated direct sunlight, which can lead to different shades of colouring across your kitchen.

 

6) Vinyl Floor

This is what vinyl flooring looks likeAvailable in all colours and designs, vinyl can be the perfect option if you are looking for a specific style to compliment your kitchen. While vinyl’s ability to mimic the look of other flooring such as stone, make it a great option for those on a budget.

Costs

Positioned towards the more affordable end of the flooring costs spectrum, vinyl can often be purchased for around £10 per square metre with the cost rising as the quality increases. Installation is also a relatively straightforward undertaking, and those with the confidence can save money by carrying out the work themselves.

Pros

An incredibly durable flooring option that’s also comfortable underfoot, vinyl is the perfect option for those managing with a young family or pets. It’s also highly water resistant, so it’s perfect for dealing with all the spills and accidents that come with a busy family kitchen.

Cons

While highly durable, if your vinyl floor does become damaged you will have to remove the flooring as vinyl cannot be refurnished like other surfaces. Another unfortunate issue with vinyl are the volatile organic chemicals used during the manufacturing process. And unfortunately these chemicals can be released after the floor has been installed leading to issues including respiratory and eye problems.

 

7) Carpet

This is what carpet looks likeNot the first choice when it comes to a new floor for a kitchen, and for obvious reasons, carpet should generally be avoided in kitchens.

However, for those determined to use carpet within their kitchen, carpet tiles can be a great way of managing any unsightly stains. By simply purchasing a few extra alongside your tiles, you can replace them if they become too damaged.

Cost

A relatively cheap option for flooring, carpet can range in price from anything from £5 per square metre and upwards depending on the quality. However, keep in mind that this just one part of the price you will have to pay, as you will also need to account for including underlay and fitting.

Pros

Available in all colours and patterns, finding a carpet to match your current kitchen shouldn’t be too much of an issue. It also can’t be beat when it comes to comfort, which makes it great for those busy evenings cooking up a feast in the kitchen.

Cons

Traditionally not the best choice when it comes to the kitchen, carpet can present plenty of problems within a busy day-to-day environment, as spills are often tough to remove. Meanwhile, mould and mildew find carpet the ideal location to grow which can cause numerous issues when it’s also the room you prepare food in.

 

In summary

When it comes to settling on the right flooring for your kitchen it can sometimes seem a bit overwhelming. However, with our guide to the best flooring options for your kitchen, you’ll hopefully have more of an idea of where to start.

Whatever you need help with, no job is too big or too small for our handpicked tradesman. Available when you need them, you can book a Homyze tradesman through our app, website, or simply over the phone.